State Violence Against Black and Brown Youth

State Violence Against Black and Brown Youth
Police gather outside the Ferguson Police Department Thursday, March 12, 2015, after two police officers were shot according to witnesses in Ferguson, Mo. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

Police gather outside the Ferguson Police Department Thursday, March 12, 2015, after two police officers were shot according to witnesses in Ferguson, Mo. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

State Violence Against Black and Brown Youth

I first met Emery Robinson at Albert Leonard Junior high school in, New Rochelle, NY. He was two grades behind me, a 7th grader when I was in the 9th grade. He was known as a manchild, not only in terms of size, because he was much bigger than most 9th graders even then, but because he had the physicality and presence of a young man. He could have easily passed for 17 or 18 years old when, by my recollection, he could not have been much more than 11 or 12.

His face, however, betrayed his youth; cherubic, at times shy, an easy laugh and mischievous smile, he was what one would refer to as “not a bad kid,” to indicate someone who was a bit mischievous but not malicious. Because of his size he made the basketball team, though it did not seem as if he had a great interest in basketball. He gravitated to kids who were a little older, bolder and who occasionally got into trouble, petty theft, but no violence to my knowledge. In my home town, junior high school was a pivotal point in the lives of many poor and not so poor, black, brown and working class kids from many diverse backgrounds. The ones who smoked reefer first were the first to experiment with hallucinogens, the first to inject cocaine and perhaps heroin and from there, among the first to contract HIV/AIDS, which back then was a death sentence. Emery was spared this fate, this particular end to his life.

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